. . . florally . . .

And this is the last pattern from 2018: florally: a beanie with stranded colorwork, knit bottom up and seamlessly in the round.

_DSC4256 carreIt starts with some corrugated ribbing in 2/1.

flora sample 1 wip carre

From wherever you look at it, it is never the same.

There are no repeats, in fact it is one large chart covering the whole circumference of the hat.

_DSC4246 carre

There is only one size due to the complexity of the colorwork, but it is easy to alter the stitch gauge to obtain other sizes. See the note about changing gauge and size below.

I made two of them in a different color range. The first on above in a very contrasting black and white, and the second one in more harmonising colors. So much harder to photograph.

_DSC4214 carre
The colorwork is charted only. Tips to successfully knit stranded colorwork are included.

One size
to fit head circumference: 54 – 58 cm / 21¼ – 22¾“
finished measurement at the brim: ± 51 cm / 20”
brim slightly stretched: ± 54.5 cm / 21½”
finished height: ± 21 cm / 8¼”

_DSC4227

A note on gauge and size
• For a larger head circumference you will need larger needles and DK weight at a gauge of 25 sts and 30 rows.
The finished measurement at the brim is 54 cm / 21½” and fits a head of 57 to 61 cm / 22½” to 24”
• For a smaller head circumference you will need smaller needles and fingering weight at a gauge of 28.5 sts and 34 rows.
The finished measurement at the brim will be 48 cm / 19” and fits a head of 50 to 54 cm / 19½” to 21¼”

What you’ll need
sport / 5 ply
MC (main color): dark blue ± 100 m / 110 yards
CC contrasting color: (violet in first sample and white in second sample) ± 80 m / 90 yards
2.5 mm (US 1½) circular needle
3 mm (US 2½) circular needle
4 markers
tapestry needle

Gauge
27 sts and 32 rows in stranded colorwork with the larger needle = 10 x 10 cm (4 x 4”)

Check it out here

I added a few curls on the black/white beanie from this post.

_DSC4244

and a crocheted pompom from the same post on the purple/black one.

florally

This was 2018 … Up to 2019 in next posts …

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. . . Celtic hoodie . . .

More cabling … I am getting the taste of it …

_DSC3271carre

Two squares, two triangles and two tubes. Throw some cable patterns and some Celtic knots in and you get: a Celtic hoodie constructed in a special manner.

_DSC3315+

It is worked top down and is completely seamless. First the hood is worked flat in one piece. When it is long enough stitches are cast on for the body which is basically a rectangle with a cabled texture.

The top of the body is folded to the front to form the shoulders. Next, the sleeves are worked in the round. Like this …

xxx wip

This photo is without the hood because I started with a provisional cast on and added the hood later. But the pattern starts with the hood first.

Stitches are picked up along the hood and body to work a cabled edge that fluently flows in the Celtic knots at the fronts.

_DSC3299-

 

It has been some kind of a puzzle to draw these Celtic knots continuously without a beginning and an end …

Well, there are two ends, I must admit, so it is more Celtic bits and ends, haha.

_DSC3307-carre

The cables and celtic knits are charted and fully written out.
There are some special increases that are more rounded than usual: a photo tutorial for these special increases and decreases is included.

Lots of illustrations and schematics are added, everything you need is right there while you’re working. There is no need to search on the www.

Sizes
S-M / L-XL / XXL
finished measurements chest: 46½ / 52 / 56“ (120 / 132 / 144 cm)
Intended to be worn with lots of positive ease (20 to 50 cm / 8 to 20”). The sample is size S-M worn with 30 cm / 12” of positive ease.

What you’ll need
worsted weight / 10ply
Total yardage: ± 1350, 1500, 1650 m (1500, 1650, 1800 yards)

5 mm (US 8) circular needle or size to obtain gauge
4.5 mm (US 7) circular needle
cable needle
5 markers

Gauge
19 sts and 26 rows in stitch pattern with the larger needle and blocked = 10 x 10 cm (4”x 4”)

Find out more here

_DSC3289+carre

_DSC3279+carre

_DSC3280-carre

Bye, bye…

I think I will be using those Celtic cables again for something else … Stay tuned …

. . . summer . . .

Linen is the perfect yarn for summer clothes. It is a bit hard to the hands to knit it up, but it gets softer with every soak. And it has a lovely shine and drape – although drape is not really necessary in the second project, on the contrary …

  1. Linne #2 See the blog post here and the pattern here
    I bought some lovely linen in 2 nice colors: aqua blue-green and a very, very dark  blue, nearly black.
    I will try to make a gradient of these 2 colors. And I will use ‘helix knitting’ to make it. If I can find out how…

    And I did 🙂 It is not difficult at all. It is surprisingly easy, just knitting in the round and picking up the other color at the start of each round, no twisting of yarns, no pulling on the yarn ! That is very important …
    helix
    I pulled a little too hard, even though I didn’t get the feeling I pulled at all. So it is really important to work very loosely when switching yarns.

    I started the ‘helix’ like this: slip half of the just worked stitches back to the left needle and knit them again with the 2nd color. When you come to the other color, just pick up that color (don’t twist both yarns) and knit a round. And so on, and so on … Super easy peasy. When my first color was nearly finished I ended in the same way. I knit half of the stitches with color 1, slipped them back to the left needle and knit them again with color 2. The bottom is worked in color 2 only.

    linne stvictor 7
    linne stvictor 5
    liinne stvictor 2

     

  2. And then there is #2: a linen hat
    It is inspired by a free pattern available  on Ravelry: windansea
    But I made it top down and I also wanted another shape.
    Starting with a cast on in the round of 8 sts: just turn the yarn twice around a finger and k1, p1 four times in the circle. After having knit the 8 sts in the first round, you can pull on the tail and close the round …
    hat WIP-
    I also wanted another shape like the one I was wearing with my second linne tee (see above). I love that shape, but it was not mine. Had to return it. :/
    I added short rows to shape the brim so that it is larger at the front.When it was finished I crocheted a wire at the edge and sewed a large elastic at the bottom of the crown to shape the hat.
    I found the perfect moulding form (an old basket)…
    hat-
    and applied fabric stiffener and left it to dry …hat blocked 2-

    A ribbon and tada 🙂

    Happy summer

. . . linne tee . . .

Summer is coming, the sun is shining … It is time for skirts and light summer tops …

hello yellow

Hello yellow, my latest pattern has been published yesterday…

Linne tee: a simple, summery tee with an easy lace pattern at the top and bottom. Knit in linen or linen / cotton blend, it is perfect for sunny summer days.

linen mod 1-ridge-

linen back 3+

It is worked seamlessly starting at the top lace section at the back.
Both sleeve caps and the back are worked bottom up at the same time. The edges of the sleeve are worked at the same time in a slip stitch pattern. It slightly pulls in the sleeve caps preventing them from flaring out too much.

detail top

Stitches are put on hold for the back neck and increases are made to shape the V-neck at the front. Once the sleeve caps are finished, the body is worked top down. But first, a few short rows are worked at front and back for a better fit / shape. Then the body is knit in the round and finished with the lace edge at the bottom.

linne mod bottom

Sizes
XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL
finished measurements (chest): 31½, 35½, 39½, 43¼, 47¼, 51¼ “ (80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130 cm)

Intended to be worn with some positive ease or no ease.

What you’ll need
linen ( or cotton or cotton/linen blend)
in sport weight / 5 ply
the yardage is an estimate (the yardage of linen is difficult to calculate: the testers all came out with a different yardage). This is an average:
± 600, 700, 770, 850, 930, 1000 m (660, 770, 850, 930, 1020, 1100 yards)

3.5 mm (US 4) circular needle
3.5 mm (US 4) straight needles (optional)
4 mm (US 6) circular needle

crochet hook for the provisional cast-on

6 markers

Gauge (with the smaller needle and blocked)
21 sts and 32 rows in stockinette stitch = 10 x 10 cm (4”x4”)

Check it out here

. . . wild roses . . .

Muts met bloem xxx

At this moment, my new design: wild rose cardigan is being testknit here

rose babe sleeve+text-

It features delicate branches with some spring flowers on the sleeves. It is not that easy because as you can see there are three colors per round in the colorwork. There are several techniques to solve that problem and they will be explained in the pattern.

But then, I made a swatch with the same flowers in only two colors to show the effect to my testers…

I don’t like swatching, it feels like a waste of time. The best swatch one can make is a hat, isn’t it ? Never enough hats.

hat

I used three different rests of green yarn from my stash… From a dark bottle green to a fresh yellowish green. And to make the gradient between the two colors I alternated the them in every round … Oh, I love the colors of that hat. The main color is the softest yarn ever. It is Misty Mina form the Natural Collection: 70% Alpaca, 20% Silk, 10% Cashmere goat…

And then I got kinda carried away, haha …wild rose collection-

A hat, a pair of fingerless mitts and a doubled cowl: wild roses collection

wild rose coll mod3-

wild rose coll mod5

Added a crocheted pompom on the hat like this

The four patterns will be collected in an e-book: wild roses. The cardigan will be added when the testknit is finished at the end of the month. Included are  tips on colorwork and fair isle, a tutorial on how to use Jenny’s cast on as a provisional cast on and on how to graft in a separate pdf: **Wild rose tips**.

The e-book is already available now at a discounted price.

Read more about them here, here and here.

. . . spirale . . .

This was great fun to design …

blue

Spirale is a hat worked back and forth at a very tight gauge. It starts at the top with only four stitches gradually getting wider and forming a strip.

spirale 5 ridges straight + wedge

The strip is spiraling down joining as you go with a special technique. It can be worn as is – a long hat – or the brim can be folded back and the top spirals pushed down.

grey inside

It is a a very fun and addictive project.

spirale 4 mod 8+

I made four of them and some of the testers made several too. It has been known that finished hats often disappear…

tomorrow

Sizes
S, M and L: head circumference: 52-56 / 55-59 / 58-63 cm (20½-22” / 21½-23¼” / 23-25”)
finished measurements (brim): 50.5 / 52.5 / 55 cm (19¾” / 20½” / 22”)

mecha spirale montage

What you’ll need
The heavier the yarn weight, the better it keeps its shape.
minimum aran weight / 10 ply (200 m / 220 yards per 100 gr)
to bulky weight (120 m / 130 yards per 100 gr)
± 165 to 230 m / 180 to 250 yards
3 mm (US 2½) circular needle (60 or 80 cm / 24 to 31½ “)
4 removable markers
tapestry needle
Don’t try to make this hat in a DK-weight yarn, unless you pair it with a fingering weight held together – sport or DK weight held double should also work. It really should be a very dense and stiff fabric to keep its shape.

Gauge
23 sts and 22 ridges (= 44 rows) in garter stitch, unblocked
= 10 x 10 cm (4”x4”)

Check it out here

. . . dove stone . . .

A new hat called Dove stone.

dove stone 3

Well, not so new. It took me a year to write the pattern, haha.

But it is pattern  99

**Dove stone** is a hat worked bottom up and seamlessly in the round. It starts with a clever and neat way to make a tubular cast on in a contrasting color. It has a cable stitch pattern that gradually decreases to shape the crown. It can be made as a ‘light’ slouchy hat or blocked on a plate for a beret shape.

**Sizes**
available for size: S, M and L
head circumference: 52-56 cm / 55-59 cm / 58-63 cm (20½-22” / 21½-23¼” / 23-25”)

**What you’ll need**
DK / 8 ply
Yardage for the hat
± 150 m / 165 yards
small leftovers in a contrasting color for the cast on and the pompom.
4 mm (US 6) circular needle
3 mm (US 2½) circular needle
crochet hook for the provisional cast on
cardboard and scissors to make a pompom or tassels (optional)
marker
tapestry needle

**Stitches**
twisted ribbing 1/1 (in the round): (k1 tbl, p1)
stitch pattern

**Gauge**
25 sts and 30 rows in stitch pattern, slightly stretched: = 10 x 10 cm (4”x4”) with the larger needle

**Techniques used**: tubular cast on
pompom, tassels or something different

3-dove-stone

Check it out here