. . . X-tee . . .

It all started with this very easy stitch pattern when I made a few little swatches to try out new patterns. I must admit that I rarely use stitch patterns from a book, I usually make them up myself…

Find out more and see more examples of X-tee here

With a yarn that has some sheen it gives the right but subtle contrast to show off the slipped stitch pattern. I used a cotton/bambou blend.

X-tee is a short sleeved tee or a pullover with drop shoulders and 3/4 sleeves. Both options are included.

I like to wear it over a shirt like this.

It features a subtle and very easy stitch pattern, a V-neck that follows the diagonal lines, and split hems. It is best to choose a yarn that has some sheen to enhance the effect of the diagonal lines.


First the back is worked top down and back and forth to the armpits. Then stitches are picked up to work the fronts to the armpits. From here the body is worked in the round in one piece. Stitches are picked up to work the 1/1 ribbing or to work longer sleeves using the same slipped stitch pattern.
Finally an applied I-cord can be added to finish the neckline – if desired.

Sizes
XS / S / M / L / XL / XXL / XXXL
finished measurements chest: 31¾ / 35¼ / 40¼ / 43¼ / 46½ / 50½ / 53½ “ (80.5 / 89.5 / 102 / 110 / 118 / 128.5 / 136 cm)

Intended to be worn with 7 to 13 cm / 3 to 5” of positive ease.

What you’ll need
fingering weight / 4ply
short sleeved tee
± 730, 820, 950, 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300 m (800, 900, 990, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400 yards)
with elbow sleeves
add 200 to 350 m / 220 to 380 yards

3 mm (US 2½) circular needle and straight needles (optional) or size to obtain gauge
2.5 mm (US 1½) circular needle
3 mm (US 2½) double pointed needle for the I-cord finishing at the neck (optional)
6 markers
scrap yarn or stitch holders

Gauge
10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”) = 28 sts and 56 rows in slip stitch pattern with the 3 mm / US 2½ needle

Find out more and see more examples of X-tee here

. . . Florally – the pullover . . .

More info and examples here

When I was drawing the chart for this hat, I knew I would do more with it.

The original chart was much larger than what the part I used to make the hat…

I just didn’t know yet what I would make of the whole chart…

Until I dug up two beautful dark colored skeins of Dye For Yarn… and a blueish-greyish-natural skein from Snail Yarns.

They work so well together, the dark bordeaux looks almost velvet against the naturals.

Florally is a loose pullover with a V-neck, drop shoulders, 3/4 sleeves and a unique colorwork pattern at the bottom. Starting with a provisional cast on, the back is first worked bottom up and back and forth.

Stitches are bound off for the back neck, a subtle patterned saddle shoulder is worked followed by the fronts that are knitted top down to the armpits.

The saddle shoulder is quite subtle with a leaf motif in purl stitches and a third color – if desired.

Here is a little trick when joining both fronts of the V-neck worked top down. When you have knit both fronts to the right length and you join them, it often looks sloppy with a few elongated stitches at that join. To reinforce the join there is a simple trick: twist the last stitch of the right front and the first stitch of the left front you are joining to…


So, knit to the last stitch (or two stitches) of right front – in the photo above you can see that I twisted 4 stitches (2 at each front) -, place those stitch(es) on a cable needle and hold in front, then knit 1 or 2 stitches at the beginning of the left front, knit the stitches from the cable needle and continue the row (of course you don’t need a cable needle to twist those stitches, you can do it without, I only used it to explain the principle).

Another – even easier – method is to k2tog those 2 stitches, but you will end up having 1 stitch less.

From this point the body is worked further down in the round.
Stitches are picked up for the sleeves which are worked top down and in the round with a smaller motif at the cuffs.

Finally an applied I-cord finishes the neckline.

Sizes
XS / S / M / L / XL / XXL / XXXL
finished measurements chest: 31½, 34½, 39, 43, 47, 50½, 54“ (80, 88, 100, 109, 119, 129, 138 cm)
Intended to be worn with 7 to 13 cm / 3 to 5” of positive ease

What you’ll need
fingering weight / 4ply
sleeveless tee
MC1: ± 730, 820, 950, 1000, 1100, 1200, 1300 m (800, 900, 990, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1400 yards)
CC: ± 180, 200, 220, 250, 280, 300, 340 m (200, 220, 240, 280, 310, 330, 370 yards)
MC2 (optional) a small quantity ± 50 m (55 yards)
with elbow sleeves
add 200 to 350 m / 220 to 380 yards of MC1
and 60 m / 66 yards of CC

3 mm (US 2½) circular needle and straight needles (optional) or size to obtain gauge
3.25 mm (US 3) circular needle
2.75 mm (US 2) circular needle
3 mm (US 2½) double pointed needle
cable needle
4 markers
scrap yarn or stitch holders

Gauge
10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”) = 27.5 sts and 40 rows stockinette with the 3 mm / US 2½ needle
or 27.5 sts and 38 rows in stranded colorwork with the 3.25 mm / US 3 needle.

More info and examples here

. . . pull – o – mousse . . .

Fancy some bubbles ?

A while ago I made these socks: sock-o-mousse and I also made a pattern for it. They look fun, don’t they ?

I really like those random bubbles. There is more to do with them, me thinks.

I searched my stash and found several lonely skeins in tints of blue and some white yarn too. Perfect… Ready to start pull-ô-mousse.

It starts with a small double neckband. Then, a few short rows are worked to shape the back neck. It became a cropped pullover worked top down and seamlessly in the round.


The circular yoke features a fun colorwork with randomly placed bubbles. Well it looks random, but it is not really random. Hard to tell, but the yoke is made of repeats of the same bubble chart.

It looks a little different from traditional circuar yokes, doesn’t it ?

The colorwork is charted only. Don’t worry if you make mistakes in this part, nobody will see it 😀
Tips on how to successfully knit stranded colorwork are included.

The white bubbles on the body and sleeves and the blue bubbles on top of the yoke are added using duplicate stitch.

If you like to use up some stashed yarn and work gradients (fades) as in the sample, instructions how to work slow or quick gradients are included.

About the pattern: pull-o-mousse

Available for sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL, XXXL
finished measurements (chest): 30 / 34 / 38 / 42½ / 46½ / 50 / 54” (77 / 87 / 97 / 108 / 118 / 128 / 137 cm)
Intended to be worn with some positive ease.

What you’ll need
fingering weight / 4 ply
Color A (white in the sample):
± 240/270/300/330/360/390/420 m (260/300/330/360/390/420/460 yards)
Color B (blue in the sample):
± 900/1000/1100/1230/1340/1450/1560 m (1000/1100/1220/1350/1470/1600/1700 yards)

3 mm (US 2½) circular needle
3.25 mm (US 3) circular needle for the stranded colorwork, if necessary.
2.75 mm (US 2) circular needle for the hem and cuffs
two or three 2.5 mm (US 1½) circular needles
crochet hook
4 markers
or 8/8/8/8/10/10/10 markers if you wish to place markers between repeats

Gauge
27 sts and 39 rounds stockinette stitch
with the 3 mm (US 2½) needle
27 sts and 39 rounds stranded knitting
with the larger needle
= 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”)

Check it out here

. . . three easy pieces, #3 . . .

This is #3 of the three easy pieces, a simple pullover with a basic raglan sleeve inset knit at a loose gauge. Check it out here and here

For this one I used a fingering weight and a mohair lace weight together.

It starts in the same manner as both other patterns with a welted cast on. The turtle neck is added afterwards…

I also added a large 2/2 ribbing at the hem and knitted ‘balloon’ sleeves instead of the tapered sleeves…

It is worked top down and seamlessly in the round as are the tow other patterns from this bundle.
At any time you can switch between the three patterns. They all start in the same way and have the same stitch counts. Check #1 for a short sleeved or 3/4 tapered sleeved version in gradients or with some colorwork and A-line body. Go to #2 if you want to embellish your sweater with some steeked fents and sewn in petals (there is also a version if you don’t like to cut in your knitting).

The neck edge, hem and cuffs are started or finished with a welted cast one / bind off.

In this version a turtle neck, cuffs and hems in 2/2 ribbing are added. Choice between long tapered sleeves or balloon sleeves.

Sizes:
XS / S / M / L / XL / XXL / XXXL
finished measurements chest: 32 / 35 / 39 / 43 / 47 / 50 / 54 “ (81 / 88 / 99 / 109 / 119 / 128 / 137 cm)

What you’ll need
worsted weight, two fingering weights held together or a sport weight paired with a lace weight or mohair
total yardage for a long sleeved pullover with a turtle neck as pictured
± 820/900/1000/1100/1200/1320/1420 m (900/1000/1100/1200/1320/1420/1450 yards)
if you use yarn held double, you need to double the amount

5 mm (US 8) circular needle or size to obtain gauge
4 mm (US 6) circular needle
4.5 mm (US 7) circular needle
4 markers
tapestry needle

Gauge
stockinette stitch blocked with the largest needle: 16.5 sts and 25 rows = 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”)

Check it out here and here

So which one will it be ?

. . . three easy pieces, #2 . . .

Actually #2 came first…

I had this (very old) pullover that is one of my favorite mid-season wears. ‘Old’ because I knit this back in 2005!! and I still wear it.

Don’t remember which yarn I used for it. It is probably a mix of wool and acrylic ??? I knitted it in plain stockinette stitch and top down to use every meter of it.
I thought it looked a bit dull and too grey, although it is a beautiful grey with some blue in it…

So I ‘STEEKED’ and sewed separately knitted petals in the fents. In 2005 I didn’t know the word ‘steek’, didn’t even know it was a known technique… I just cut the fents in my pullover and with my sewing machine added a zigzag along the edges…

I wrote a pattern for it only just now. With ‘steeks’ (cutting) or without… Instructions are included to knit the fents without the cutting… because that might look scary…

This is my new version holding two yarns together: BC Garn semilla, sport weight in a lovely ‘vieux rose’ and Mirasol Yarn Sulka Legato, colorway pearl, a light fingering weight.

#2 of Three easy pieces is a simple pullover with a raglan sleeve inset knit at a loose gauge as the two others. Top down, seamlessly in the round and featuring eye catching ‘petals’.
The two methods are included:

  • if you are adventurous and like to change the position of the petals, they can be made by steeks and cutting
  • or you can knit the fents without having to cut the fabric.

The ‘petals’ are knit separately in the round and sewn in place giving the effect that they are behind the fents.


If you use the steek method, you should use a sticky woolen yarn, don’t use superwash wool or cotton yarns. Instead of using worsted weight yarn you can use a sport weight or light DK weight yarn paired with mohair.

The hem and cuffs are finished with a welted bind off giving it a minimal finished look that prevents stockinette stitch from rolling.

There are two other versions of this pattern, but they look completely different. I wrote them up in two more patterns. They are bundled in one e-book called: three easy pieces, three patterns to mix and match. More about #1 here and #3 in next post.
At any time you can switch between the three patterns. They all start in the same way and have the same stitch counts. Check #1 for a short sleeved or 3/4 tapered sleeved version in gradients or with some colorwork and A-line body. Go to #3, if you want to add a turtle neck and balloon sleeves.

Sizes:
XS / S / M / L / XL / XXL / XXXL
finished measurements chest: 32 / 35 / 39 / 43 / 47 / 50 / 54 “ (81 / 88 / 99 / 109 / 119 / 128 / 137 cm)

What you’ll need
worsted weight, two fingering weights held together or a sport weight paired with a lace weight or mohair
If you use the steek method, you should use a sticky woolen yarn, don’t use superwash or cotton yarns

main color: ± 750/820/900/1000/1100/1200/1300 m (820/900/1000/1100/1200/1320/1420 yards)
if you use yarn held double, you need to double the amount

small rest of worsted or DK weight in different colors for the ‘petals’

5 mm (US 8) circular needle or size to obtain gauge
6 markers
tapestry needle
sewing machine (for the steek method)

Gauge
stockinette stitch blocked: 16.5 sts and 25 rows = 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”)

Find out more about it here

. . . three easy pieces, #1 . . .

Sometimes I need an easy knit for watching tv or reading…

That is how this started: a quick knit on large needles (5 mm / US 8 needle) with an easy raglan shaping using only yarns from my stash.

I held several yarns together: a lace weight from Bart en Francis held double and a Lace yarn from Wollmeise. It is knit at a loose gauge, so it grew quite fast.

I wonder if I should add sleeves or not ? I always find short sleeves or sleevecaps very cute, but I don’t wear that very often.

First let’s finish the body and decide later.
I got kinda bored, of course and added a few subtle flowers in stranded knitting at the bottom.

The bind off (and the cast on) method is a welted bind off / cast on that prevents stockinette stitch from rolling too much. It gives it a no-nonsense, minimal finished look.

Hmm, cute, but I think I will add sleeves, I still have some yarn left from the B&F lace and Wollmeise.

#1 of Three easy pieces is a simple tee or pullover with a basic raglan sleeve inset knit at a loose gauge. It is worked top down and seamlessly in the round.

It is an ideal project to work up some stashed yarn. Use a worsted weight… or hold two fingering weights together, pair a sport weight with a lace weight… whatever you find in your stash and looks good together.

Knit a cropped tee with sleeve caps, a longer tee with 3/4 sleeves or a pullover with long sleeves. Add some stripes, a gradient (fade) or some stranded knitting. Instructions for slow and quick gradients and a chart of flowers are included.

The neck edge, hem and cuffs are finished with a welted cast on or bind off giving it a minimal finished look that prevents stockinette stitch from rolling.

I made two other versions of this pattern, but they look completely different. I wrote them up in two more patterns. They will be ‘mix and match’ patterns bundled in one e-book called: three easy pieces. More about them in next posts.
At any time you could switch between the three patterns. They all start in the same way and have the same stitch counts. Check #2 if you want to embellish your sweater with some steeked fents and sewn-in petals (there is also a version if you don’t like to cut in your knitting). Go to #3 if you want to add a turtle neck and balloon sleeves.

Sizes:
XS / S / M / L / XL / XXL / XXXL
finished measurements chest: 32 / 35 / 39 / 43 / 47 / 50 / 54 “ (81 / 88 / 99 / 109 / 119 / 128 / 137 cm)

What you’ll need
worsted weight, two fingering weights held together or a sport weight paired with a lace weight or mohair

total yardage for a 3/4 sleeved cropped pullover as pictured
± 750/820/900/1000/1100/1200/1300 m (820/900/1000/1100/1200/1320/1420 yards)
if you use yarn held double, you need to double the amount

5 mm (US 8) circular needle or size to obtain gauge
6 markers
tapestry needle

Gauge
stockinette stitch blocked: 16.5 sts and 25 rows = 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”)

Check it out here or the bundle here

. . . Acorn and oak leaf legwarmers . . .

Here is the second pair….

Are you ready, boots ?


These Acorn and oak leaf legwarmers are the perfect companion for an Autumn walk. I just came back from a long walk in the woods wearing them…

I love that color, don’t you ?

For this pair, I held a sport weight and a fingering weight yarn together to get the gauge of a worsted weight.

They are both from Malabrigo yarns. The sport weight is Arroyo (forgot the name of the colorway) and the fingering weight is Malabrigo Sock in colorway Marte.

Featuring and oak leaf and acorn pattern, broken rib, an I-cord and small knitted acorns to finish of the I-cord.

Sizes
The broken rib pattern is quite stretchy and fits easily many sizes.
S/M/L to fit circumference calf : ± 31 / 35 / 39 cm (± 12¼ / 13¾ / 15½ “)
Finished circumference unstretched : ± 27 / 30 / 34 cm (± 10½ / 11¾ / 13½ “)
Finished height as pictured = ± 35 cm (13¾”).
Can easily be made longer by working more repeats.

What you’ll need
worsted weight or two strands of fingering weight held together
± 250 to 350 m / 275 to 380 yards
fingering weight
leftovers in a matching or contrasting color for the I-cord
4.5 mm (US 7) circular needle or 5 double pointed needles
3 mm (US 2½) circular needle for the Estonian braid
two 2.5 mm (US 1½) double pointed needles for the I-cord
tapestry needle
2 markers

Gauge
The row gauge is not important: the legwarmers can be made as long as desired by working more repeats.
The acorn and oak leaf pattern (22 sts x 28 rows) unblocked = 11 x 10 cm / 4¼” x 4”.
Broken rib pattern unstretched: 22 sts = 10 cm / 4”.

Find out more here

. . . Blueberry legwarmers . . .

These boots are made for walking …

These Blueberry legwarmers are perfect for a nature walk in the cold seasons, or – as someone suggested – for biking.

But I feel they could do well in a couch too, with a good book and a cup of tea or a glass of wine 😀

They feature lacey leaves, bobbly blueberries, some cable knitting, ribbing, an I-cord and small pompoms to finish… (how to pompom here)

Sizes
The broken rib pattern is quite stretchy and fits easily many sizes.
S/M/L to fit circumference calf : ± 31 / 35 / 39 cm (± 12¼ / 13¾ / 15½ “)
Finished circumference unstretched : ± 27 / 30 / 34 cm (± 10½ / 11¾ / 13½ “)
Finished height as pictured = ± 35 cm (13¾”).
Can easily be made longer by working more repeats.

What you’ll need
worsted weight or two strands of fingering weight held together
± 250 to 350 m / 275 to 380 yards
fingering weight
leftovers in a matching or contrasting color for the I-cord and the pompoms
4.5 mm (US 7) circular needle or 5 double pointed needles
3 mm (US 2½) circular needle for the Estonian braid
two 2.5 mm (US 1½) double pointed needles for the I-cord
tapestry needle
2 markers

Gauge
The row gauge is not important: the legwarmers can be made as long as desired by working more repeats.
The berries and leaves pattern (21 sts) unblocked = 11 cm / 4¼”.
Broken rib pattern unstretched: 22 sts = 10 cm / 4”.

Find out more here.

Next up are the Acorn and oak leaf legwarmers (Looks like I always work in pairs)

. . . curcuma . . .

Oups, seems that I never presented this pattern last year. Now that the days are getting colder and shorter, I dug up this cardigan again. In a sunny color, perfect for the darker days…

Curcuma is an open front cardigan with an attached scarf. The stitch pattern of the collar and scarf is reversible and looks attractive on both sides.


Instructions are given to knit the cardigan with or without the attached scarf.

But I prefer it with the scarf 😀

First, stitches are cast on to work the collar/scarf partially. Then, the scarf stitches are put on hold. Stitches are picked up along the collar to start working the body simultaneously with the sleeves and collar.

The sleeve inset is based on the ‘contiguous sleeve inset’ developed by Susie Myers. The body is worked flat, top-down and seamlessly. No sewing except for a few stitches to sew down the pockets at the inside. The sleeves are worked top down and in the round ending with the same stitch pattern on the cuffs.

Tech edited by Sue-Cat

Sizes : XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL
finished measurements: 34½, 38, 42½, 48, 52½, 59 “ (88, 96, 108, 122, 134, 150 cm)
Intended to be worn with a lot of positive ease: 5 to 10 “ / 12 to 24 cm.
Model is wearing M with 7” / 18 cm of positive ease

What you’ll need
± 1500/1700/1900/2100/2350/2650 m (1640/1850/2100/2300/2600/2900 yards) worsted /10 ply weight
If you want to make it without the attached scarf yardage will be less. (about 250 m / 275 yards)
long (minimum 100 cm / 40”) 5 mm (US 8) circular needle or 2 shorter 5 mm (US 8) circular needles for the cast on.
shorter 5 mm (US 8) circular needle for the body and the sleeves
and straight 5 mm (US 8) needles (if you prefer working on straight needles for the body and the scarf)
cable needle

markers: it is best to use 2 different kind of markers:
· 4 markers to use in the stitch pattern (m’s)
· 4 markers to mark the sleeves (M1 to M4)

Gauge
18 sts and 29 rows in broken seed stitch pattern (see page 5) = 10 x 10 cm (4”x4”)

Find out more about the pattern here

. . . reversibles #1 and #2 . . .

I like to combine different techniques, try out new things, experiment…

Can you see what is special about those cables ?


It is a mix of reversible stitches like garter stitch and ribbing, of cable knitting and a few aspects from double knitting.

There is no wrong side or no right side. Both sides are showing the cables, but they are mirrored which makes them completely reversible.

There are two patterns: Reversible cabled scarf #1 is based on the same cable as the one used in ‘Evidemment‘. But I reworked it to be used as a reversible cable. It became long scarf with cabling on a garter stitch background on both sides !!

#1 is more difficult to execute than #2: it has right leaning and left leaning cables and they are both worked on right side rows only. What is the right side or the wrong side anyway 😉 – BTW it is good idea to add a removible stitch marker on the right side!!!

Cables to the left are trickier to work because you will need two cable needles.

A few more photos of #1

What you’ll need

Reversible scarf #1
Yardage will depend on length of the scarf
As pictured: ± 700 m / 770 yards of worsted weight yarn
4.5 mm (US 7) straight needles
two cable needles
tapestry needle
2 markers if you wish to place them between charts (optional)

Gauge
worsted weight or heavy DK weight
The gauge is not crucial but will affect the size of your scarf
gauge of the sample (unblocked): 26 sts and 28.5 rows in pattern = 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”)

gauge of the sample (blocked and lengthwise stretched)
30 sts and 22 rows in pattern = 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”)

Size of the sample
at the given gauge (unblocked), width: ± 29 cm / 11½”, length: ± 150 cm / 59”
(blocked and lengthwise stretched), width: ± 25 cm / 9¾”, length: ± 188 cm / 74”

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

This is Reversible cabled scarf #2 , a very long scarf with cables on a garter stitch background on both sides !!!

This one is easier than scarf #1 because it only uses cabling to the right… BUT the cabling occurs on Wrong sides too.

The pattern follows the charts as worked up in the sample. But you can switch between charts to make a shorter or longer scarf.
You could knit an easy scarf using only chart A throughout. Or you can start with chart A, work chart C and end with chart E skipping charts B and D.

What you’ll need
Reversible scarf #2
Yardage will depend on length of the scarf
As pictured: ± 800 m / 880 yards of DK weight yarn
4 mm (US 6) straight needles
cable needle
tapestry needle
6 markers if you wish to place them between cables (optional)

Gauge
DK weight
The gauge is not crucial but will affect the size of your scarf
gauge of the sample (unblocked): 27 sts and 30 rows in pattern = 10 x 10 cm (4” x 4”)

Size
at the given gauge, width: ± 23.5 cm / 9¼”
length of the sample: ± 244 cm / 96”

The stitch patterns of both patterns are charted and fully written.

Tech edited by Sue-Cat

No more worries how to wear your cabled scarf, if the good side is up or not.

😀 😀 😀

Check out here and here